NOLAGrrlNYC
A few weeks ago I went to the annual Asimov Debate at the American Museum of Natural History. You can watch the video of the debate here. The moderator is Neil deGrasse Tyson, whom I know some of you know and love.
Today on the way to work I saw that Bonhams is auctioning off space artifacts including Neil Armstrong’s checklist from the Apollo 11 mission.

A few weeks ago I went to the annual Asimov Debate at the American Museum of Natural History. You can watch the video of the debate here. The moderator is Neil deGrasse Tyson, whom I know some of you know and love.

Today on the way to work I saw that Bonhams is auctioning off space artifacts including Neil Armstrong’s checklist from the Apollo 11 mission.

A few more images from The Power of Poison, on exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History until August 10, 2014. I loved the use of Grecian pottery as a canvas on which to project the videos of the myths regarding poison. Beautiful curation. 

The Power of Poison is on exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History until August 10, 2014. I  think it is on my list of favorite special exhibitions because of the variety of media and amount of interaction it contains.

I volunteered at the first World Science Festival in New York and knew that it was just the start of something big and wonderful and now everyone can attend the World Science U. Go check it out!

jtotheizzoe:

What a list!

Just in case you should ever fool yourself into thinking that we’ve got most things figured out, here’s 50 reminders that the unknown is a heckuva lot more exciting than the known.

As Stuart Firestein reminds us:

Knowledge is a big subject. Ignorance is bigger…and it is more interesting.” 

Pair that with the difference between simplicity and familiarity, featuring Veritasium, MinutePhysics and Richard Feynman.

explainers-nysci:

It’s the most wonderful time of the year and you know what that means- time to bring out all of your winter gear and bundle up. But dropping temperatures can also make room for some cool science experiments, like making frozen bubbles! This activity should work if it is 32 degrees Fahrenheit or…

Because you’re never too old to blow bubbles.

Happy Pythagoras Day - MoMath hosted a Math Happening tonight at the Flatiron Building in Manhattan. Hundreds of participants and countless more spectators surrounded the building and held glow bars to show that the building roughly approximates the 5 - 12 - 13 Pythagorean triple.

It was wonderful to see so many people out to see something math-y. And even better were all the people who just happened to be walking by who stopped and asked what was going on. I know many people think that New Yorkers just trudge along the avenues ignoring their surroundings and each other. 

There won’t be another Pythagorean triple date for almost a century so I’m glad I got there to celebrate this one.

I got a chance to hear Amy Robinson speak last night at the NY Academy of Science as part of the Imagine Science Film Festival. Eyewire is a computer game that anyone can play that helps scientists map the brain. How cool is that? You can be a citizen scientist and instead of wasting your computer game playing hours (oh don’t pretend like you don’t sneak in some solitaire or Angry Birds or something) you can help science.

I think this is my favorite picture I took at the Maker Faire this year. The colors. The swirling orbs like a mini cosmos. The utter curiosity and wonder as the little people explored. Stay curious little ones. The world needs more explorers.

I think this is my favorite picture I took at the Maker Faire this year. The colors. The swirling orbs like a mini cosmos. The utter curiosity and wonder as the little people explored. Stay curious little ones. The world needs more explorers.

(Source: Flickr / nolagrrlnyc)

Maker Faire Part 2, Hall of Science, Queens, NYC